What are Coronaviruses?

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29 June 2020
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What are Coronaviruses?

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Coronaviruses are a large group of viruses that can cause disease in animals and humans. It often causes upper respiratory symptoms, such as a cough or runny nose, but some can cause more serious illnesses.

 

Coronaviruses and About COVID-19

Coronaviruses (COVID-19) is a disease detected in late 2019 and declared an epidemic on March 11.

  • Wash your hands frequently with soap and water for at least 20 seconds at a time.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a handkerchief when you cough or sneeze.
  • Do not reuse the same handkerchief after coughing, sneezing or cleaning your nose
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces.

Coronaviruses (COVID-19) Spread?

Coronaviruses, such as COVID-19, often spread by coughing or sneezing in the air, close personal contact (including touch and waving) or by touching your nose, mouth or eyes before washing your hands.

 

Symptoms that will arise when exposure and coronaviruses are infected;

Symptoms COVID-19 is fever, cough, breathing or difficult breathing, shaking, shaking with shaking, muscle pain, headache, sore throat and loss of taste or smell. Symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure.

We recommend that you stay at home and separate yourself from other people at home as much as possible:

  • If you are a COVID-19 patient
  • If you suspect COVID-19
  • If you are COVID-19 or if you have mild symptoms

Call your healthcare provider to explain your symptoms and how you might be exposed to the virus before going to a healthcare professional, clinic, hospital, or emergency room.

Coronaviruses symptoms of  (COVID-19)?

Know how it spreads

  • There is currently no vaccine to prevent 2019 coronaviruses (COVID-19).
  • The best way to prevent the disease is to avoid exposure to this virus.
  • The virus is thought to spread mainly from person to person.
    • It is transmitted between people who are in close contact with each other.
    • It is transmitted by respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes or speaks.
    • These droplets can descend into the mouths or noses of people nearby or possibly inhaled into the lungs.
    • Some recent studies suggest that COVID-19 can be spread by people without symptoms.

What Do You Protect From Covid-19?

 

  • Wash your hands frequently/li>
  • Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds after you cough or sneeze, especially when you are in a public place or when your nose is flowing.
  • If soap and water are not available, use a hand sanitizer containing at least 60% alcohol. Clean all the surfaces of your hands and rub them together until dry.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.

Avoid close contact

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick, even inside your home.
  • Leave social distance between you and people outside your home.
    • Note that some people who do not have symptoms can also spread the virus as a carrier.
    • Stay at least 1.5 m (about 2 arms long) away from other people.
    • Don’t walk around in groups.
    • Stay away from crowded places and avoid mass meetings.
    • Staying away from others is especially important for people who are at a higher risk of developing the disease.
    • Cover your mouth and nose with a medical mask while around others
  • Even if you don’t feel sick, you can spread COVID-19 to others.
  • Everyone should wear a mask, for example, when shopping at the market and when they have to go out in public places.
    • Masks should not be placed on young children under 2 years old, people who have difficulty breathing or are unconscious, helpless or otherwise unable to remove the mask without help.
  • The mask is to protect other people if you are infected.
  • Do not use a face mask designed for a healthcare professional.
  • Keep holding about 1 meter between yourself and others. Using a mask is not a substitute for social distance.
  • If you are in a special setting and the mask is not on your face, always remember to cover your mouth and nose with a handkerchief when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow.
  • Dispose of used masks.
  • Wash your hands immediately with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
  • If soap and water are not available, clean your hands with a hand sanitizer containing at least 60% alcohol.

Coronaviruses Clean and disinfect

  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces daily. This includes desks, door handles, light switches, counters, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, taps and sinks.
  • If the surfaces are dirty, clean them. Use detergent or soap and water before disinfection.
  • Then use a household disinfectant.How is corona cleaned and disinfected?

 

How is corona cleaned and disinfected?

  • Use reusable or disposable gloves for routine cleaning and disinfection.
  • Clean the surfaces with soap and water, then use disinfectant.
  • Cleaning with soap and water reduces germs, dirt and stains on the surface. Disinfecting kills germs on the surfaces.
  • Apply routine cleaning of frequently woven surfaces. The most contacted places are:
    • Tables, door handles, light switches, counters, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, taps, sinks, etc.
    • Diluted household bleach solutions can also be used, if appropriate for the surface to be disinfected.
  • Check the label to see if the bleach is designed for disinfection and make sure that the product’s expiration date has not passed.
  • Bleaches that are used safely on colored clothes or designed for whitening may not be suitable for disinfection.
  • Home bleach will be effective against coronaviruses when properly diluted.
    Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for proper ventilation techniques after application. Household bleach should never be mixed with ammonia or another cleaner. Leave the solution on the surface for at least 1 minute. Mix the following ingredients to make a bleach solution:
  • Mix 5 tablespoons (1/3 cup) of bleach into 5 liters of water
  • Bleach solutions will be effective for up to 24 hours of disinfection.
  • Alcohol solutions containing at least 70% alcohol can also be used.

-Use on soft surfaces

For soft surfaces such as carpeted floors, carpets and curtains.

  • Clean the surface using soap and water or cleaners suitable for use on these surfaces.
  • Wash items (if possible) according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Use the most suitable water setting and dry items completely.
  • Wash items (if possible) according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Use the most suitable water setting and dry items completely.

 

Disinfection of electronic items

  • For electronic devices such as tablets, touch screens, keyboards and remote controls. Consider installing a wipeable cover over electronic products
  • Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for cleaning and disinfection.
    • Use alcohol-based wipes or sprays with at least 70% alcohol. Dry the surface thoroughly.

-Disinfection of Laundry

For clothing, towels, sheets and other items.

  • Wash the products according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Use the hottest water setting and dry the laundry completely.
  • Wear disposable gloves while handling the dirty clothes of a sick person.
  • Dirty clothes of a sick person can be washed with other people’s clothes.
  • Do not shake dirty clothes
  • Clean and disinfect the laundry according to the instructions above
  • Take off the gloves and wash hands immediately.

-Clean your hands frequently

  • Wash your hands frequently with soap and water for 20 seconds.
    • Always wash your hands thoroughly immediately after removing gloves and after contacting someone who is sick.
  • Hand sanitizer: If soap and water are not already available and hands are not visibly dirty, use a hand sanitizer containing at least 60% alcohol. However, if hands are visibly dirty, always wash hands with soap and water.
  • Other occasions for cleaning hands:
    • After cleaning the nose, coughing, or sneezing
    • After using the toilet
    • Before eating or preparing food
    • After contact with animals or pets
    • Before and after providing routine care to another person who needs help (such as a child)
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.

When someone is sick

-Bedroom and bathroom

  • The sick person should remain separate from other people in the home (as far as possible).
  • If you have a separate bedroom and bathroom: Put on disposable gloves and only clean the area around the sick person, as the area gets dirty. This will help limit your communication with the sick person.
    • Carers can provide personal cleaning supplies to the sick person (if appropriate). Materials include masks, paper towels, cleaners and CE registered disinfectants.
    • If they feel the condition, the sick person can clear their area.
  • If there is a shared bathroom: The sick person should clean and thoroughly disinfect the bathroom after each use. If this is not possible, it should wait for the caregiver as much as possible before cleaning and disinfection.

-Food

  • Separate places to eat: If possible, the sick person should eat (or feed) in his room.
  • Wash dishes and items using disposable gloves and hot water: If you need to wash used dishes, glasses / cups or silverware by hand, be sure to wash them with gloves. Wash with soap and hot water or in the dishwasher.
  • Wash your hands after removing gloves or using used items. –

-Garbage

  • Special, lined trash can: If possible, reserve an individual trash can for the sick person. Use disposable gloves when removing garbage bags and handling and disposing of garbage. Then wash your hands.

 

What is social distance?

Social distance, also called “physical distance,” means distance between yourself and other people outside your home. To apply social or physical distance:

  • At least 1.5 m (about 2 arms length) than other people
  • Do not meet in groups
  • Stay away from crowded places and avoid mass meetings

In addition to the daily steps to prevent COVID-19, distance between you and others is one of the best tools we should avoid exposure to this virus and slow its spread locally and in the country and the world.

Limit your close contact with people outside your home, indoors and outdoors. Since people can spread the virus without knowing they are sick, it is important to stay away from others, if possible, even if you do not have symptoms. Social distance is especially important for people at risk of severe disease in COVID-19.

Many people have personal circumstances or situations that create difficulties in implementing social distance to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

 

Why should you apply social distance?

It spreads among people who have been in close contact for a long time as coronaviruses. An infected person coughs, sneezes or speaks, and droplets from his mouth or nose spread through the air and occur when people are thrown into the mouth or nose of people nearby. Droplets can also be inhaled into the lungs. Recent studies show that infected people without symptoms also play a role in the spread of COVID-19.

It is possible for a person to take coronaviruses by touching a virus-infected surface or object, and then by touching their mouth, nose, or eyes. However, it is thought to be the main way of spreading the virus. COVID-19 can live on a surface for hours or days depending on factors such as sunlight, moisture and surface type. Social distance helps limit opportunities to come in contact with dirty surfaces and infected people outside the home.

Although the risk of severe disease is different for everyone, everyone can take and spread COVID-19. Everyone has a role to slow spreading and protect themselves, their families and their communities.

Tips for social distance
  • Follow the guidance of the authorities from the places you live.
  • If you need to buy food or medicine at the market or pharmacy, stay away from others, use a mask.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a mask, such as a grocery store, cover the face with a medical mask or protective visor if there is no mask around others, including when you have to go out.
  • Stay away from crowded places outside your home, such as a friend’s house, parks, restaurants, shops, or anywhere else
  • This advice applies to people of all ages, including teens and young adults. Children should not play face-to-face when they are out of school.
  • Work from home whenever possible.
  • Avoid using any kind of public transport, horse riding or taxi if possible.
  • If you are a student or parent, talk to your school about digital / distance learning options.

 

Stay away while staying away. It is very important to stay in touch with friends and family who do not live in your home. Call, video chat or stay connected using social media. Everyone reacts differently to stressful situations and socially can be difficult to separate yourself from someone you love.

Outbreaks can be stressful

The 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak can be stressful for people. Fear and anxiety about a disease can be overwhelming and cause strong emotions in adults and children. Dealing with stress empowers you, the people you care about, and your community.

Stress during the infectious disease outbreak may include:

  • Fear and anxiety about your own health and the health of your loved ones
  • Changes in sleep or eating patterns
  • Difficulty sleeping or concentrating
  • Worsening of chronic health problems
  • Worsening mental health conditions
  • Increased use of alcohol, tobacco or other drugs
Everyone reacts differently to stressful situations

How you respond to the outbreak may depend on your past, what makes you different from other people, and the community you live in. People who can respond more strongly to the stress of a crisis include:

  • Elderly people and people with chronic diseases who are at higher risk of developing severe disease than COVID-19
  • Children and youth
  • People who help cope with COVID-19 like doctors, other healthcare providers, and first responders
  • People with mental health problems, including problems with substance use
Take care of yourself and your community

Taking care of yourself, friends and family can help you deal with stress. Helping others cope with their stress can further strengthen your community.

Ways to deal with stress

  • Take a break to watch, read or listen to the news, including social media. Repeated hearing about pandemic can be bothersome.
  • Take good care of your body.
    • Take deep breaths, exercise or meditate.
    • Eat a healthy, balanced diet.
    • Exercise regularly, sleep abundantly.
  • Avoid alcohol and drugs.
  • Take time to relax. Try to do other activities that you like.
  • Connect with other people. Talk to people you trust about your concerns and how you feel.

 

Know the methods to help reduce stress

Share the facts about COVID-19. Understanding the risk to yourself and the people you care about can make an epidemic less stressful.

When you share the right information about COVID-19, you can help people feel less stressed and connect with them.

Take care of your mental health

Call your healthcare provider if stress interferes with your daily activities for several consecutive days.

People with pre-existing mental health problems should continue their treatment and be aware of new or worsening symptoms.

For parents

Children and young people react, in part, to what they see from adults around them. When parents and carers cope calmly and safely with COVID-19, they can provide the best support for their children. Parents can be more reassuring to other people around them, especially children, if they are better prepared.

Track behavioral changes in your child

NC2ot all children and young people react to stress in the same way. Some common changes to watch include:

  • Excessive crying or sadness in young children
  • Impaired behavior of older children (eg toilet accidents or bedwetting)
  • Extreme anxiety or sadness
  • Unhealthy eating or sleeping habits
  • Nervousness and “behaving” behavior in young people
  • Poor school performance or school avoidance
  • Attention and concentration difficulty
  • Avoiding past activities
  • Unexplained headache or body pain
  • Use of alcohol, tobacco or other medicines
Ways to support your child
  • Talk to your child or child about the COVID-19 outbreak.
  • Answer questions about COVID-19 and share them in a way your child or child can understand.
  • Make sure your child or child is safe. Let them know that there is no problem when they feel sad. Share with them how to deal with your own stress so they can learn how to deal with you.
  • Limit your family’s exposure to the news coverage of the event, including social media. Children can misinterpret what they hear and fear something they don’t understand.
  • Try to keep up with regular routines. If schools are closed, create a program for learning activities and relaxing or fun activities.
  • Be a role model. Take a break, get plenty of sleep, exercise and eat well. Connect with your friends and family.
For people at high risk of disease

People are at high risk for severe disease, such as older adults, underlying health conditions, so people are therefore at risk for COVID-19. Special considerations include:

  • Older adults and people with disabilities are at high risk for mental health problems such as depression.
  • Mental health problems can occur as physical complaints (such as headaches or abdominal pain) or conscious problems (such as concentration problems).
  • Doctors may need to treat mental health problems:
    • People with disabilities who focus on treating their underlying health conditions compared to people with disabilities.
    • Elderly adults, because depression can be confused with a normal part of aging.

 

What healthcare providers can do?
  • Help connect people with family and loved ones to help reduce feelings of boredom and social isolation.
  • Let older adults and people with disabilities know that it is common for them to feel distressed during a crisis. Remind them that it is important to ask and accept help.
  • Have a procedure and referral sheet ready for anyone who is severely troubled or who has expressed his desire to harm him or himself or anyone else.
What can be done about coronaviruses?
What can communities do?

Community preparedness planning for coronaviruses should include organizations that support the needs of the elderly and people with disabilities and their communities.

  • Many of these individuals live in the community, and many depend on the services and support provided in their homes or communities to maintain their health and independence.
  • Long-term care facilities should be careful to prevent transmission and spread of the coronaviruses epidemic.
For people from quarantine

If a healthcare provider thinks that you may be exposed to an outbreak of coronaviruses even if you do not get sick, leaving others can be stressful. Everyone feels different after quitting the quarantine.

Emotional reactions to quarantine may include:

  • Mixed feelings, including quarantine relief
  • Fear and anxiety about your own health and the health of your loved ones
  • Stress from watching yourself or being watched by others for signs and symptoms of COVID-19
  • Sadness, anger or frustration, because even if you are determined not to be contagious, there is a fear of getting in touch with your friends or loved ones.
  • Failure to perform normal work or parenting duties during quarantine
  • Other emotional or mental health changes

Even if children or someone they know is released from quarantine, they may feel upset or experience other strong emotions.

Questions About Coronaviruses

Answer to Covid-19 Questions

Answering COVID-19’s questions can cause you emotional harm and experience secondary traumatic stress. Secondary traumatic stress are stress reactions and symptoms caused by exposure to another person’s traumatic experiences rather than being directly exposed to a traumatic event.

Things you can do to reduce stress reactions:

  • Accept that secondary traumatic stress can affect anyone who helps families after a traumatic event.
  • Learn symptoms such as physical (fatigue, illness) and mental (fear, abstinence, guilt).
  • Allow time for you and your family to stop responding to the pandemic.
  • Create a menu of personal care activities that you enjoy, such as spending time with friends and family, exercising or reading a book.
  • Follow the press and media about COVID-19 coronaviruses.
  • If you think or are overwhelmed that COVID-19 affects your ability to take care of your family and patients, as you did before the outbreak, seek help.
  • One of the ways to protect against coronaviruses is disinfectant use. Click for disinfectant news
  • Feeling socially isolated, especially if they live alone or in a community environment that doesn’t allow visitors because of the epidemic.
  • If your loved ones are deprived of daily life activities, they feel guilty about it.
  • Increased levels of distress in the following situations:
  • If you are concerned about mental health, such as depression, before the epidemic.
  • Lives in low-income households or speech impaired
  • Fearful due to age, race or ethnicity, disability, or the possibility of COVID-19 spreading.
Questions About Coronaviruses

Keep in touch with your loved ones frequently. Communication can help you and your loved ones feel less isolated and isolated. Consider connecting with your loved ones as follows:

  • Telephone
  • Email
  • Letter or postcard
  • Message to Girl
  • Video chat
  • Social media
Help keep your loved ones safe.

Know what medications your loved one is taking. Try to help them have 4-week prescription and over-the-counter drugs. And see if you can help them have extra.

  • Monitor other medical supplies needed (oxygen, incontinence, dialysis, wound care) and create a support plan.
  • To minimize trips to stores, stock up on pristine foods (canned foods, baked beans, pasta) so you have them at home.
  • If you are interested in your loved ones living in a nursing facility, watch the situation and talk to the facility managers directly or on the phone. Ask other people’s health often and avoid prevention if there is an epidemic.
  • Take care of your own emotional health. Caring for a loved one can be an emotional state, especially during an outbreak by coronaviruses. There are ways to support yourself.
  • If you are sick, stay home. Do not visit families or friends who are at higher risk of serious illness due to coronaviruses. Use virtual communication to support your loved ones and keep them safe.
What healthcare providers can do ?

 

  • Help connect people with family and loved ones to help reduce feelings of boredom and social isolation.
  • Let older adults and people with disabilities know that it is common for them to feel distressed during a crisis. Remind them that it is important to ask and accept help.
  • Have a procedure and referral sheet ready for anyone who is severely troubled or who has expressed his desire to harm him or himself or anyone else.
What can be done about coronaviruses?

What can communities do?

  • Community preparedness planning for coronaviruses should include organizations that support the needs of the elderly and people with disabilities and their communities.
  • Many of these individuals live in the community, and many depend on the services and support provided in their homes or communities to maintain their health and independence.
  • Long-term care facilities should be careful to prevent transmission and spread of the coronaviruses epidemic.
For people from quarantine
  • If a healthcare provider thinks that you may be exposed to an outbreak of coronaviruses even if you do not get sick, leaving others can be stressful. Everyone feels different after quitting the quarantine.
  • Emotional reactions to quarantine may include:
  • Mixed feelings, including quarantine relief
  • Fear and anxiety about your own health and the health of your loved ones
  • Stress from watching yourself or being watched by others for signs and symptoms of COVID-19
  • Sadness, anger or frustration, because even if you are determined not to be contagious, there is a fear of getting in touch with your friends or loved ones.
  • Failure to perform normal work or parenting duties during quarantine
  • Other emotional or mental health changes
  • Even if children or someone they know is released from quarantine, they may feel upset or experience other strong emotions.
Questions About Coronaviruses

Answer to Covid-19 Questions

Answering COVID-19’s questions can cause you emotional harm and experience secondary traumatic stress. Secondary traumatic stress are stress reactions and symptoms caused by exposure to another person’s traumatic experiences rather than being directly exposed to a traumatic event.

Things you can do to reduce stress reactions:

  • Accept that secondary traumatic stress can affect anyone who helps families after a traumatic event.
  • Learn symptoms such as physical (fatigue, illness) and mental (fear, abstinence, guilt).
  • Allow time for you and your family to stop responding to the pandemic.
  • Create a menu of personal care activities that you enjoy, such as spending time with friends and family, exercising or reading a book.
  • Follow the press and media about COVID-19 coronaviruses.
  • If you think or are overwhelmed that COVID-19 affects your ability to take care of your family and patients, as you did before the outbreak, seek help.

One of the ways to protect against coronaviruses is disinfectant use. Click for disinfectant news.